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  • Cilia beat to an unexpected rhythm in male reproductive tract, study in mice reveals

    Waves of undulating cilia drive several processes essential to life. They clear debris and mucus from the respiratory tract, move spinal fluid through the brain and transport embryos from the ovaries to the uterus for implantation. According to a new study in mice, however, cilia perform somewhat differently in the male reproductive tract.

  • Researchers gain control over soft-molecule synthesis

    By gaining control over shape, size and composition during synthetic molecule assembly, researchers can begin to probe how these factors influence the function of soft materials. Finding these answers could help advance virology, drug delivery development and the creation of new materials. 

  • Expert: Trump’s attitude toward immigrants, migratory laborers echoes past presidents

    President Trump’s approach to undocumented immigrants and migratory laborers follows the example of past presidents who relied on racial animus to scapegoat foreigners during times of cultural change, says U. of I. labor professor Michael LeRoy.

  • Paper: Courts check presidential powers over immigration policy

    Research by Michael LeRoy, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois, indicates that presidential powers over immigration have been significantly hamstrung by the courts, with plaintiffs winning all or part of 89 percent of the rulings in cases that consider immigration orders that affect employment relationships.

  • Deaths

    Danny L. Elam ... Randall Joseph Lutz ... Glenn Gregory Simpson ... Kent Thompson

     

  • Illinois earns Climate Leadership Award

    In recognition of its innovation and leadership in climate action, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the recipient of Second Nature’s Climate Leadership Award for four-year institutions.

  • Tap dance a highlight of spring semester at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

    Tap at Illinois will celebrate tap dancing with a semesterlong series of tap performances at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.

  • Researchers diversify drug development options with new metal catalyst

    A University of Illinois team of researchers led by chemistry professor M. Christina White has developed a new manganese-based catalyst that can change the structure of druglike molecules to make new drugs, advancing the pace and efficiency of drug development. 

  • Agencies to launch statewide mobile firefighting training resources

    The Illinois Fire Service Institute, part of the U. of I., will host a ceremony on Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 10 a.m. on the IFSI training grounds in Champaign. The event, held in cooperation with the Office of the Illinois State Fire Marshal, will officially release four mobile trailers containing equipment essential for firefighting skills training.

  • Deaths

    Edward E. Durbin ... Doris Patricia “Pat” Foster ... Judy Kurlakowsky ... Marjorie E. Nelson ... Frances Joann Pierce

  • Environmental greenness may not improve student test scores, study finds

    Researchers at the University of Illinois and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service suggest in a new study that environmental greenness may not be associated with higher test scores in schoolchildren after all.

  • December in Illinois: Tornadoes, warm temperatures and little snow

    With warmer-than-average temperatures, December 2018 brought slight snowfall and a historic late-season severe weather outbreak to Illinois.

    On Dec. 1, the National Weather Service confirmed 29 tornadoes in Illinois, an event that is considered the largest December tornado outbreak in state history, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesman for the state climatologist office at the U. of I.’s Illinois State Water Survey. The second-largest number of tornadoes in December was 21  in 1957.

  • Unmuting large silent genes lets bacteria produce new molecules, potential drug candidates

    By enticing away the repressors dampening unexpressed, silent genes in Streptomyces bacteria, researchers at the University of Illinois have unlocked several large gene clusters for new natural products, according to a study published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.

  • Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores

    Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several  carnivores are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior.

  • Highlights for the season

    The Rare Book and Manuscript Library collection includes holiday- and winter-themed books and images, such as photographs of snowflakes, a depiction of a 1683 frost fair on a frozen River Thames and illustrations of Norse folk tales.

  • Superfluidity: what is it and why does it matter?

    2018 marks the 80th anniversary of the landmark physics discovery of superfluidity. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian asked University of Illinois physics professor and 2003 Nobel Prize winner Anthony Leggett about the significance of the historic finding.

  • Illinois Public Media launches 'Reel Midwest'

    Illinois Public Media announces the launch of “Reel Midwest,” a new independent film series that aims to find the best in features, documentaries and short films in Illinois and across the Midwest. “Reel Midwest” showcases the region’s brightest talents through a selection of thought-provoking documentaries, narrative dramas and short films.

  • Study links nutrient patterns in blood to better brain connectivity, cognition in older adults

    A new study links higher levels of several key nutrients in the blood with more efficient brain connectivity and performance on cognitive tests in older adults.

    The study, reported in the journal NeuroImage, looked at 32 key nutrients in the Mediterranean diet, which previous research has shown is associated with better brain function in aging. It included 116 healthy adults 65-75 years of age.

  • Home-packed lunches include more vegetables if children help, study finds

    The number of vegetables in childrens’ home-packed lunches increased if they participated in deciding what foods to include, a University of Illinois researcher found in a new study.

  • Workplace discrimination claims fare poorly in arbitration, study says

    Employee discrimination claims largely received worse outcomes in arbitration than other work-related disputes such as wrongful termination or breach of contract, according to new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.

  • Should the tech industry end mandatory arbitration for workers?

    For tech company workers protesting sexual harassment in the workplace, there are few practical benefits to be gained from employers ending mandatory arbitration beyond an increased perception of procedural justice, says U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.

  • Deaths

    Sammy Ray “Sam” Sommer ... Kerrin Thompson

  • Twelve U. of I. undergraduates awarded Gilman scholarships to study abroad

    Twelve Illinois undergraduates have been awarded Gilman scholarships to study abroad during the spring 2019 semester.

  • What’s it take to get asylum? And what’s driving those seeking it?

    An Illinois professor who has aided in asylum cases talks about the criteria, changes in the process and why Central Americans are seeking this protection.

  • New drug seeks receptors in sarcoma cells, attacks tumors in animal trials

    A new compound that targets a receptor within sarcoma cancer cells shrank tumors and hampered their ability to spread in mice and pigs, a study from researchers at the University of Illinois reports.

  • On the Big Screen

    Screenwriter and Illinois alumnus David Magee wrote the script for "Mary Poppins Returns."

  • Saving our natural heritage, one stopper at a time

    The rubber stopper is sticky in my hands. I can see it drooping into the vial, threatening the two tiny insect specimens inside, a pair of small green stoneflies, Alloperla furcula. Vial stoppers should not be sticky, and definitely should not be melting into the glass vial holding these important reference specimens. I have to save them from total annihilation.

  • Dracula ants possess fastest known animal appendage: the snap-jaw

    Move over, trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimp: There’s a faster appendage in town. According to a new study, the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae, can snap its mandibles at speeds of up to 90 meters per second (more than 200 mph), making it the fastest animal movement on record.

  • Coping skills program for disaster survivors tested with children living in chronic poverty

    An emotional coping skills program developed for natural disaster survivors appears to help young children deal with the traumatic experiences associated with living in chronic poverty, a new study found.

  • Study: Early career choices appear to influence personality

    In the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, 16-year-old students in middle-track schools decide whether to stay in school to pursue an academic career or enroll in a vocational training program. A new study offers evidence that the path they choose influences their personality years later.

  • Planning processes for Chicago's 606 Trail spawned gentrification, study finds

    A new study examines the planning processes associated with Chicago's 606 Trail and concludes that delegating management of the project to a nonprofit may have made gentrification the most likely outcome.

  • Illinois, French partners digitizing Proust's letters

    Illinois researchers and their French partners have created a website to make thousands of letters written by Marcel Proust available to the public.

  • Deaths

    William Curtis Blaylock ... Susan Blunier ... Paula Jo Goodwin ... Barbara Clarke Swain

  • Illinois presidents: What made them agents of change?

    With the “Land of Lincoln” celebrating its bicentennial, a historian looks at the influence of four Illinois-connected presidents.

  • Oates receives digital preservation award

    Alumna Anna Oates won the National Records of Scotland Award for the Most Outstanding Student Work in Digital Preservation for her master’s thesis work on the PDF/A standard. She received the award Nov. 29 at a ceremony at the Amsterdam Museum as part of an international conference hosted by the Dutch Digital Heritage Network and the Amsterdam Museum on World Digital Preservation Day. Anna Oates received her master's degree in 2018 from the School of Information Sciences.

  • November was cold and snowy in Illinois

    The statewide average temperature for November in Illinois was 35.3 degrees, which is 7.2 degrees below normal, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey at the U. of I. November 2018 was ranked the eighth-coldest November on record.

  • What is on the horizon for global carbon emissions?

    On Dec. 5, the Global Carbon Project published the Global Carbon Budget 2018, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the carbon budget and this year’s findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian.

  • Team converts wet biological waste to diesel-compatible fuel

    In a step toward producing renewable engine fuels that are compatible with existing diesel fuel infrastructure, researchers report they can convert wet biowaste, such as swine manure and food scraps, into a fuel that can be blended with diesel and that shares diesel’s combustion efficiency and emissions profile.

    They report their findings in the journal Nature Sustainability.

  • English professor's first book tells stories of contemporary lives of black Americans

    Illinois author Nafissa Thompson-Spires has received national recognition for her first book, “Heads of the Colored People,” which uses humor and satire to tell the stories of black Americans.

  • Boys with social difficulties most susceptible to early substance use, study finds

    Boys who enter sixth-grade with co-occurring social skills, anxiety, learning and conduct problems are at the greatest risk of developing aggressive behavior and using substances by the end of eighth grade, a new study found.

  • Book by Illinois music professor looks at how Brazilian forro music, environment are connected

    Illinois ethnomusicologist Michael Silvers writes in his new book about forro music of Brazil and its connections to the environment, drought and politics.

  • Can we talk about the Illinois climate?

    Jim Angel, the Illinois state climatologist, has announced that he will retire in December 2018 after 34 years at the Illinois State Water Survey. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with him about his career, climate change and the National Climate Assessment released on Black Friday.

  • Deaths

    Alva “Tad” LeRoy Addy ... Nancy J. Blackburn ... Belle Anna Brine ... John Roy Campbell ... Judith “Judy” Arlene Corray ... Terry Denny ... Marjorie Ellen (Keagle) Lange ... Alleta A. (Sue) Moore ... John (Jim) J.E. Mullen ... George Robert Young

  • Finding darters where no one thought to look

    “Pull off in about a mile and a half,” I tell my colleague Josh Sherwood, an ichthyologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey. A minute goes by before he flips on the amber light bar over our heads and pulls the truck into the grass alongside the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway, about 60 miles west of Chicago. The ground is littered with trash, broken glass and bits of tire – like any major highway. A few feet away is a small, unnamed stream, barely more than 2 feet wide and less than 6 inches deep.

    “Why would anyone want to sample this site?” I ask myself.

  • Eleven Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Eleven faculty members at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been named to the 2018 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list.

  • Adoption of mobile payment shifts consumer spending patterns, habits

    Paying for goods with a smartphone not only increases the overall transaction amount and frequency of purchases by consumers, it also effectively replaces the actual, physical credit cards in their wallets, said Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

  • Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation begins work

    The Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation begins its work today.

  • North American checklist identifies the fungus among us

    Some fungi are smelly and coated in mucus. Others have gills that glow in the dark. Some are delicious; others, poisonous. Some spur euphoria when ingested. Some produce antibiotics.

    All of these fungi - and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, more - occur in North America. Of those that are known to science, 44,488 appear in a new checklist of North American fungi, published this month in the journal Mycologia.

  • Krannert Art Museum to offer short films, panel discussion for World AIDS Day

    Krannert Art Museum will screen short films about AIDS activism – the only downstate Illinois venue to show the films – for World AIDS Day on Dec. 1.

  • Four Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows

    Four professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2018 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are: mechanical science and engineering professor Narayana Aluru, computer science professor William Gropp and plant biology professors Andrew Leakey and Ray Ming.