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Econ UG: Course Information
Information about our ILLINOIS Department of Economics Undergraduate Courses, including descriptions, preparation, restrictions, syllabi, instructors, & other important details for students.

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  • ECON 490: Brazilian Current Economic Issues

    Our aim is to analyze several of the unique aspects of the Brazilian economic experience of the last 30 years. We will start with an overview of Brazilian economic and political history from the 1994 inflation stabilization up to now. In the remaining part we get into more details in the analysis of current important issues for the Brazilian economy. The first set of issues is related to macroeconomic stability, enclosing monetary and fiscal aspects. Then, we will tackle subjects related to social fairness: the social rights created by the Brazilian Constitution, the educational system and policies, and the social programs created in Cardoso and Lula governments. Finally, we will discuss possible causes of the current fiscal crisis and economic stagnation, and proposed reforms. Prerequisites: ECON 202 (Econ Statistics I); ECON 302 (Inter Micro Theory) or ECON 303 (Inter Macro Theory); MATH 220/221 (Calculus I) or other Calculus course
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 202; MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester): Professor Marco Bonomo (Visiting)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):

  • ECON 415: Environmental Economics

    This course focuses on application of economic theory to topical issues such as pollution, climate change, and the environmental impacts of overpopulation. Both market-based and regulatory solutions to these problems are discussed.
    Available: Fall 2018   
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Bryan Buckley
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Buckley

  • ECON 414: Urban Economics

    Analyzes the urban economy. Topics include: economic reasons for the existence of cities; the theory of urban spatial structure; the effects of taxation on housing decisions; the economics of freeway congestion; economics analysis of local public goods and services; economic analysis of rent control, slum policies and land-use controls.  3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): 
    Econ 202, ECON 302, MATH 220/221 (Calculus I) or other Calculus course; Recommended: ECON 203 (Econ Statistics II)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course 
    (varies by semester) Dan McMillen   David Albouy
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  McMillen  Albouy

  • ECON 426: Monetary Economics

    This course studies a topics related to money, banking, and financial markets. In first part of the course, we will cover the basics of financial markets and assets traded in those markets. Second part of the course covers monetary policy and how FED regulates markets with it. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Aram Grigoryan
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor): Not currently available

  • ECON 490: Middle-Eastern Economics

    This course provides students with an understanding of the business and economic conditions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The course is primarily intended to serve advanced undergraduate and master's-level students who are interested in knowing about the MENA region. The aim is to enable the students to analyze current business and economic conditions in MENA countries for academic and professional purposes. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Hadi Esfahani
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Esfahani

  • ECON 474: Econometrics of Policy Eval

    THIS COURSE IS THE SAME AS 'TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS' OFFERED IN PREVIOUS SEMESTERS. The goal of this course is to develop basic tools to understand and use modern econometric methods. We focus on estimating and making inference for causal effects with a special attention to policy relevant problems. Topics include randomized experiments, natural experiments, matching methods, instrumental variables, and regression discontinuity. We discuss theoretical aspects of these methods with detailed applications. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Eun Yi Chung
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Chung

  • ECON 490: Nonlinear Econometric Models

    Duration analysis is used to address a wide range of questions relevant for policy organizations, central banks, the financial sector, and industry generally. Examples of these questions include: what is the probability that an individual will exit unemployment this week, given he has been unemployed for the past eight weeks; what is the probability that an individual defaults on their mortgage this month given they have not defaulted for the past 12 months; what is the probability that a firm adopts a new technology this year conditional on not having adopted for the past 3 years, and how does this depend on the firm’s market share. The goal of this course is to develop the tools to understand, estimate, and interpret duration analysis models—statistical models used to analyze duration data. Students will gain practical experience organizing data and writing code for statistical software to estimate these models and better understand economic phenomena. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Russell Weinstein
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Weinstein

  • ECON 490: International Finance

    Analysis of topics in international finance, including exchange rates, monetary policy in open economies, currency unions, and financial crises, from both a theoretical and empirical perspective. Students are expected to have ECON 302 or 303, and at least basic stats- ECON 202, and ECON 203. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Greg Howard
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Howard

  • ECON 490: International Trade

    This course applies economic theory to analyze the trends and patterns of international trade and to understand the interaction between economic development, government policy, and trade. The course will also cover a number of topics of current interest, including the effects of trade barriers such as tariffs and quotas, migration, and offshoring. Prerequisites: ECON 202; ECON 302 or ECON 303; MATH 220/221 or other Calculus course. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Vinicios Poloni Sant' Anna (Grad Student)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):

  • ECON 490: Economics of Coordination

    In any institution based on the decentralized decision making of agents who follow their own goals, a fundamental question is how to structure interactions between them so that they are free to make their own decisions while avoiding outcomes that none would have chosen. The coordination failure occurs when the individuals find the aggregate effect of the decentralized decision making to be undesirable. In this course we discuss the types and causes of coordination problems, and using core concepts of economics and game theory will develop simple models to shed light on coordination problems in different markets and how institutions are developed to overcome them. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Ali Toossi
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Toossi