Econ UG: Course Information

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Econ UG: Course Information
Information about our ILLINOIS Department of Economics Undergraduate Courses, including descriptions, preparation, restrictions, syllabi, instructors, & other important details for students.

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  • ECON 102: Microeconomic Principles

    Introduction to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. Primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, the theory of the firm under varying conditions of competition and monopoly, and the role of government in prompting efficiency in the economy. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabi:  Vazquez  DiIanni

  • ECON 103: Macroeconomic Principles

    Introduction to the theory of determination of total or aggregate income, employment, output, price levels, and the role of money in the economy. Primary emphasis on monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and international economics. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabi:  Petry  McDermott

  • ECON 199: Intro to Game Theory and Economic Incentives

    Game Theory is the study of interactions between people, corporations, institutions, or countries in which each player recognizes their strategic interdependence with the other players in the game. Game Theory examines the possible solutions to games in which the players are each acting in their own self-interest. This course will provide an introduction to the core concepts and solutions along with applications and insights. This course examines a variety of applications in economics and other social sciences. For example, there are applications to price competition, management-labor relations, political elections, international relations, military strategy, legal disputes, household decision-making, and sports contests. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabi:  Vazquez  Yang

  • ECON 199/399 Independent Study

    Offered: (Every Semester) *Restrictions on course*

  • ECON 202: Economic Statistics I

    Introduction of basic concepts in statistics including the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The approach of the class includes both learning the concepts behind basic statistics and also how to apply these concepts in "real-life" situations. Utilizes a practical project format. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabus:  Schultz

  • ECON 203: Economic Statistics II

    Continuation of ECON 202. Builds upon point and interval estimation as well as hypothesis testing skills first introduced in ECON 202. Utilizes a practical project format to extend the student skill set to include simple and multiple linear regression and time series techniques. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabi:  McDermott  Petry

  • ECON 220: Intl Economic Principles

    Principles-level course in international economics for non-majors. The first half of course, international trade, covers such topics as comparative advantage, protectionism (tariff and nontariff), impact on income distribution, and industrial policies. The second half, international finance, covers topics such as balance of payments, exchange-rate determination, currency crises, dollarization, and macroeconomic policy in an open economy. Issues relating to globalization will be covered in both halves.
    Offered: (Every Semester & Summers) No Restrictions on Course (other than special sections for Honors or Living Learning Community)
    <<Click for ECON 220 Details>>

  • ECON 302: Intermediate Micro Theory

    Microeconomic analysis including value and distribution theory; analysis of the pricing of the factors of production integrated in a micro-general equilibrium context which builds towards explaining the resource allocation process. 3 undergraduate credit hours
    Past Syllabi:  Buckley  DiIanni

  • ECON 303: Intermediate Macro Theory

    The modern theory of the determination of the level and rate of growth of income, employment, output, and the price level; discusses alternate fiscal and monetary policies to facilitate full employment and economic growth. 3 undergraduate credit hours
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    Past Syllabi:
      McDermott  Zhao

  • ECON 402: American Economic History

    This course is a survey of the history of the American economy from the colonial era to the present. We will study the features and development of the American economy and examine the watershed events that have transformed it over its history. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 202, ECON 302MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) or other calculus course  
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Isaac DiIanni
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor): DiIanni

  • ECON 411: Public Sector Economics

    Economic analysis of government tax and expenditure policies; topics include public good and externality theory, public choice theory, income distribution, cost-benefit analysis, principles of taxation, tax incidence, economic effects and optimal structures of major taxes, and taxation in developing economies. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: 
    Fall 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 202; ECON 302; MATH 220/221 (Calculus I) or other Calculus course 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Hassan Arvin-Rad  
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Arvin-Rad

  • ECON 414: Urban Economics

    Analyzes the urban economy. Topics include: economic reasons for the existence of cities; the theory of urban spatial structure; the effects of taxation on housing decisions; the economics of freeway congestion; economics analysis of local public goods and services; economic analysis of rent control, slum policies and land-use controls.  3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): 
    Econ 202, ECON 302, MATH 220/221 (Calculus I) or other Calculus course; Recommended: ECON 203 (Econ Statistics II)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course 
    (varies by semester) Dan McMillen   David Albouy
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  McMillen  Albouy

  • ECON 415: Environmental Economics

    This course focuses on application of economic theory to topical issues such as pollution, climate change, and the environmental impacts of overpopulation. Both market-based and regulatory solutions to these problems are discussed.
    Available: Fall 2018   
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Bryan Buckley
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Buckley

  • ECON 417: Cost-Benefit Analysis

    This course analyzes changes in welfare in various market settings such as monopolistic and perfectly competitive markets. Students will develop the skills to account for uncertainty when weighing the costs and benefits of a project or policy, as well as its potential distributional effects. The course also examies the strategies used by governments to select from alternative policies, and how assests are purchased or sold in order to implement the policy.Offered:
    Available:  Fall 2018 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory); Recommended ECON 203
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Yi Huang (Grad Student)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)

  • ECON 418: Health Economics

    Economic analysis of the health care industry to explain the demand for and supply of medical care. Includes analysis of behavior of consumers, producers, and insurers; and public policies to regulate the industry and to provide services for the poor and elderly. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018      
    View Restriction/Override Information Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Bryan Buckley 
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Buckley

  • ECON 420: International Economics

    Introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with selected application to current problems of trade policy, balance of payments adjustment, the international monetary system, and globalization issues. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: 
    Spring 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Fabricio d'Almeida Hadi Esfahani
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) d'Almeida

  • ECON 425: Macroeconomic Policy

    Offered: Fall 2018 *Restrictions on course*

  • ECON 426: Monetary Economics

    Grigoryan:  This course studies topics related to money, banking, and financial markets. In first part of the course, we will cover the basics of financial markets and assets traded in those markets. Second part of the course covers monetary policy and how FED regulates markets with it. 3 undergraduate hours
    Zhao:  This course focuses on the money side of macroeconomics. Close to two thirds of the class deals with financial markets, instruments traded on financial markets, and financial intermediaries. The remaining class time is devoted to central bank behavior, exchange rate, and monetary policies. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Professor Rui Zhao  Aram Grigoryan
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Zhao  Grigoryan

  • ECON 426: Monetary Economics

    This course studies a topics related to money, banking, and financial markets. In first part of the course, we will cover the basics of financial markets and assets traded in those markets. Second part of the course covers monetary policy and how FED regulates markets with it. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Aram Grigoryan
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor): Not currently available

  • ECON 437: Game Theory

    Arga:  This course explores game theory and strategic decision making. Game theory is the study of strategic interaction where one person’s actions affect the actions of others. This course introduces students to the tools for modeling and solving problems with strategic interaction. The course will cover topics such as Nash equilibrium, dominance, voting, bargaining, auction, adverse selection, each of which have broad applications in economics, politics, psychology, and everyday life.

    3 undergraduate hours
    Yang:  This course explores game theory and strategic decision making. Game theory is the study of strategic interaction where one person’s actions affect the actions of others. This course introduces students to the tools for modeling and solving problems with strategic interaction. The course will cover topics such as Nash equilibrium, dominance, voting, bargaining, auction, adverse selection, each of which have broad applications in economics, politics, psychology, and everyday life.
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester)  Filia Arga  Bei Yang
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):   Yang

  • ECON 440: Economics of Labor Markets

    Studies the microeconomic determinants of labor demand and supply, economic effects of unions, and macroeconomic labor market problems. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: 
    Spring 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Yue Wu  G. Kim
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Wu

  • ECON 442: Women in the Economy

    Offered: Fall 2018 *Restrictions on course
    <<Click for ECON 442 Details>>

  • ECON 447: Econ of the Workplace

    The course focuses on the application of economic theory to solve practical personnel issues at workplace. Examines a range of topics of particular relevance to managing workforce at the organizational level, including recruitment, personnel selection, employee training, managing turnover, job design, performance evaluation and incentive compensation. Develops students’ ability to apply economic theories and analysis for managerial decision making at workplace. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Professor Yuanyuan Sun
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Sun

  • ECON 448: Employee Comp & Incentives

    Employee compensation is a critical tool for organizations to attract, retain, and motivate its workforce. The course introduces major principles in compensation design and examines the incentives embedded in compensation system. Topics include forms of pay, incentive theory, pay structure, pay-for-performance, and employee benefits. Students are expected to develop skills to design a compensation plan and evaluate compensation practices. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                  
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Professor Yuanyuan Sun
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Not currently available

  • ECON 450: Development Economics

    Analyzes the economic problems associated with newly developing nations; emphasizes their economic structures, their factor scarcities, and their programs for development. Not open for graduate credit to graduate candidates in economics. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course):  MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Richard Akresh  H. Veras De Paiva Fonseca
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Akresh

  • ECON 452: Latin American Economies

    Focuses on the economic history of the region, the recent industrialization process and its impact, the role of the state and foreign capital, the impact of the recent privatization processes, inflation and stabilization policies, and issues surrounding the distribution of income. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: 
    Spring 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Renata de Melo Caldas
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Caldas

  • ECON 460: Financial Economics

    This course discusses major topics in corporate finance: firms make decisions to increase the value of the firm for their shareholders. In the first part, we will evaluate investment projects and decide whether the firm should take or reject a project. We will also learn how to value bonds and stocks. In the second part, we will study the relationship between risk and returns. Capital asset pricing model, arbitrage and stock options will be introduced. In the third part, we will talk about firms’ capital structure and payout policy. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 102 (Microeconomic Principles); ECON 103 (Macroeconomic Principles); MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1); ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Xing Gao (Advanced Graduate Student; taught same course Spring 2017.)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Gao

     

  • ECON 471: Intro to Applied Econometrics

    Introduction to specification, estimation, prediction and evaluation of econometric models, emphasizing the interplay between statistical theory and economic applications. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: 
    Fall 2018     
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Hassan Arvin-Rad
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Arvin-Rad

  • ECON 472: Financial Econometrics

    Offered: Fall 2018 *Restrictions on course
    <<Click for ECON 490 Details>>

  • ECON 474: Econometrics of Policy Eval

    THIS COURSE IS THE SAME AS 'TOPICS IN ECONOMETRICS' OFFERED IN PREVIOUS SEMESTERS. The goal of this course is to develop basic tools to understand and use modern econometric methods. We focus on estimating and making inference for causal effects with a special attention to policy relevant problems. Topics include randomized experiments, natural experiments, matching methods, instrumental variables, and regression discontinuity. We discuss theoretical aspects of these methods with detailed applications. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Eun Yi Chung
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Chung

  • ECON 475: Economic Forecasting

    Shin:  Decision-making often requires forecasting relevant variables in the future time period over which the outcome of a decision is realized. This course provides an overview of modern, quantitative, statistical and econometric methods for forecasting and evaluating forecasts. Topics include linear regressions; modeling and forecasting trend and seasonality; characterizing and forecasting cycles; MA, AR, and ARMA models; forecasting with regressions; evaluating and combining forecasts; unit roots; stochastic trends; ARIMA models; and smoothing. Advanced topics such as volatility measurement, modeling, and forecasting will be covered if time permits. 3 undergraduate hours
    Philipps:  This course provides an overview of methods for economic forecasting. Topics include linear regressions; modeling and forecasting trend and seasonality; characterizing and forecasting cycles; MA, AR, and ARMA models; forecasting with regressions; evaluating and combining forecasts. Advanced topics such as unit roots, stochastic trends, ARIMA models, and smoothing will be covered as time permits. Students need to write computer program codes (MATLAB, Eviews, or R) to do forecasting. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                  
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 102 (Microeconomic Principles); ECON 103 (Macroeconomic Principles); MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1); ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Professor Minchul Shin  Collin Philipps
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Shin  Philipps

  • ECON 480: Industrial Comp and Monopoly

    Analyzes the ways firms and markets are organized, how they interact, outcomes of various types of firm behavior and performance of markets, and causes and types of market failure. Particular emphasis on the contribution of game theory as the equilibrium concept in oligopoly settings. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)  
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Ali Toossi  Ziyi Qiu 
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor)Toossi Qiu

     

  • ECON 481: Govt Reg of Economic Activity

    Analysis of economic bases, policies, and consequences of government regulation of economic activity. Reasons for government intervention in market behavior, methods of government intervention, and outcomes are studied. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Ziyi Qiu
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Qiu

     

  • ECON 483: Econ of Innovation and Tech

    Offered: Summer 2017 *Restrictions on course
    <<Click for ECON 483 Details>>

  • ECON 484: Law and Economics

    Applications of economic theory to problems and issues in both civil and criminal law and the effect of legal rules on the allocation of resources; includes property rights, liability and negligence assignment, the use of administrative and common law to mitigate market failure, and the logic of private versus public law enforcement. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Colleen Schultz
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Carlson

  • ECON 490: International Trade

    This course applies economic theory to analyze the trends and patterns of international trade and to understand the interaction between economic development, government policy, and trade. The course will also cover a number of topics of current interest, including the effects of trade barriers such as tariffs and quotas, migration, and offshoring. Prerequisites: ECON 202; ECON 302 or ECON 303; MATH 220/221 or other Calculus course. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Vinicios Poloni Sant' Anna (Grad Student)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):

  • ECON 490: Brazilian Current Economic Issues

    Our aim is to analyze several of the unique aspects of the Brazilian economic experience of the last 30 years. We will start with an overview of Brazilian economic and political history from the 1994 inflation stabilization up to now. In the remaining part we get into more details in the analysis of current important issues for the Brazilian economy. The first set of issues is related to macroeconomic stability, enclosing monetary and fiscal aspects. Then, we will tackle subjects related to social fairness: the social rights created by the Brazilian Constitution, the educational system and policies, and the social programs created in Cardoso and Lula governments. Finally, we will discuss possible causes of the current fiscal crisis and economic stagnation, and proposed reforms. Prerequisites: ECON 202 (Econ Statistics I); ECON 302 (Inter Micro Theory) or ECON 303 (Inter Macro Theory); MATH 220/221 (Calculus I) or other Calculus course
    Available: Fall 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 202; MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester): Professor Marco Bonomo (Visiting)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):

  • ECON 490: International Finance

    Analysis of topics in international finance, including exchange rates, monetary policy in open economies, currency unions, and financial crises, from both a theoretical and empirical perspective. Students are expected to have ECON 302 or 303, and at least basic stats- ECON 202, and ECON 203. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Greg Howard
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Howard

  • ECON 490: Nonlinear Econometric Models

    Duration analysis is used to address a wide range of questions relevant for policy organizations, central banks, the financial sector, and industry generally. Examples of these questions include: what is the probability that an individual will exit unemployment this week, given he has been unemployed for the past eight weeks; what is the probability that an individual defaults on their mortgage this month given they have not defaulted for the past 12 months; what is the probability that a firm adopts a new technology this year conditional on not having adopted for the past 3 years, and how does this depend on the firm’s market share. The goal of this course is to develop the tools to understand, estimate, and interpret duration analysis models—statistical models used to analyze duration data. Students will gain practical experience organizing data and writing code for statistical software to estimate these models and better understand economic phenomena. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Russell Weinstein
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor) Weinstein

  • ECON 490: Business Cycles & Econ Growth

    This is an advanced course in macroeconomics that discusses the frameworks used to understand short-run fluctuations (business cycles) and long-run economic growth. The models are then evaluated to see how they square with the data focusing on the U.S. economy in particular. The objective of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation in rigorous economic modeling and the analysis of macroeconomic data so that they can understand and independently analyze various macroeconomic phenomena. To do so, this course will cover neoclassical and modern theories of economic growth and discuss several views of the business cycle ranging from new classical to New Keynesian economics. 3 undergraduate hours  
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Chen Yeh
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Yeh

  • ECON 490: Economics of Coordination

    In any institution based on the decentralized decision making of agents who follow their own goals, a fundamental question is how to structure interactions between them so that they are free to make their own decisions while avoiding outcomes that none would have chosen. The coordination failure occurs when the individuals find the aggregate effect of the decentralized decision making to be undesirable. In this course we discuss the types and causes of coordination problems, and using core concepts of economics and game theory will develop simple models to shed light on coordination problems in different markets and how institutions are developed to overcome them. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Ali Toossi
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Toossi

  • ECON 490: Middle-Eastern Economics

    This course provides students with an understanding of the business and economic conditions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The course is primarily intended to serve advanced undergraduate and master's-level students who are interested in knowing about the MENA region. The aim is to enable the students to analyze current business and economic conditions in MENA countries for academic and professional purposes. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester) Hadi Esfahani
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Esfahani

  • ECON 490: History of Modern Econ Thought

    This course is about the history of ideas in economics to help students to understand and appreciate the intellectual development of the "dismal science'' that have shaped the world as we know it. The first half of the course will be devoted to the era of mercantilism, followed by the school of the Physiocrats, and then covering the ideas of what Keynes coined as "classical economists", such as Smith, Malthus, Stuart Mill, Ricardo, and Marx among others. The second half of the course will start from Keynes and Keynesianism (yes! they are different), followed by the monetarists up to the Lucas critique and the rational expectations revolution. Finally, the course will explore the impact of the history of ideas in the current macro-development literature. A reflection on the methodological aspects of economics as a science will take place during the semester as well, probably at the beginning of the course. In the end, this is nothing but a story of scientific revolutions with several paradigms opposing each other, and influencing the economic policy that has transformed the fate of nations. As Keynes wrote in the first pages of his General Theory (1936), "the ideas of economists (...) are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed, the world is ruled by little else''.
    Available: Spring 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory) 
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Luis Saenz
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Saenz

  • ECON 490: Economics Growth & Development

    This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of economic growth and income differences across countries. The course focuses on both the historical experience of countries that are currently wealthy and the process of catch-up by poor countries. Students are introduced to the latest theoretical tools, data, and insights on economic growth. 3 undergraduate hours
    Available: Fall 2018      
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): ECON 202; MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1); ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester)
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  

  • ECON 490: Numerical Methods Econ Finance

    Offered: Fall 2017 *Restrictions on course
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  • ECON 490: Topics in Econometrics

    Offered: Fall 2017 *Restrictions on course
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  • ECON 490: Econ of Information

    PENDING: Fall 2017 *Restrictions on course
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  • ECON 490: Migration

    Offered: Fall 2017 *Restrictions on course
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  • ECON 490: Econ of Organizations

    Offered: Fall 2017 *Restrictions on course
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  • ECON 490: Econ of War, Terror & Conflict

    The course aims to cover three inter-related topics: inter-country way, internal conflicts (including civil war and ethnic conflicts), and terrorism. It would discuss why countries may go to or prepare for war at phenomenal economic cost when negotiated settlement is an option, choice and efficiency of alternative methods of raising an army and economic costs of war, determinants of internal conflicts such as inequality, ethnic diversity, poverty and macroeconomic shocks, and their characteristics, causes and patterns of terrorism, trade off between defensive and offensive counter-terrorism strategies and economic impacts of terrorism. 
    Available: Spring 2018                 
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    Prerequisites (Must be complete BEFORE taking this course): MATH 220 or MATH 221 (Calculus 1) & ECON 302 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory) or ECON 303 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory)
    Instructor(s) Teaching Course (varies by semester):  Satya Das
    Syllabus (varies by semester and instructor):  Das