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  • Scholars in the Midwest Partner to Solve Today’s Challenges

    "In the following Q&A, Antoinette Burton, a professor of history and of gender and women’s studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and principal investigator of Humanities Without Walls, talks about the program’s origins, how the arts inspire social change, and why the Midwest is a microcosm of complex global issues."

  • Announcing the 2019 Humanities Without Walls Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium is pleased to announce the 2019 Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows.

    As in 2017, this year’s call for applications was national one. Consequently this summer, students from 30 universities from across the US will join HWW in Chicago to learn how they can leverage their humanities skills and expertise inside and outside of the academy. To learn more about these summer career diversity workshops for pre-doctoral students in the humanities, please visit the HWW website.

  • Announcing the 2018 Humanities Without Walls Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium is pleased to announce the 2018 pre-doctoral workshop fellows. These thirty pre-doctoral students will participate in a three-week intensive, residential career diversity workshop this summer that instructs students in the various ways they can leverage their pre-existing and developing skill sets towards the pursuit of careers in the public humanities and the private sector. 

    See the full list of 2018 pre-doctoral workshop fellows. 

  • Humanists Win Major Grant to Explore the Future of the Historical Record

    From  The Classroom and the Future of the Historical Record: Humanities Education in a Changing Climate for Knowledge Production Research Challenge Project. 

     

    The Humanities Without Walls Consortium, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, fosters interdisciplinary, collaborative research, teaching, and scholarship in the humanities, sponsoring new areas of inquiry that cannot be created or maintained without cross-institutional cooperation.   On Thursday, December 14, the Consortium announced the results of its latest research challenge initiative, “The Work of the Humanities in a Changing Climate.”  It awarded one of these grants—a multi-year investment of $138,360—to a team of humanists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Michigan State University, and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  The award will support their multi-year research project, titled “The Classroom and the Future of the Historical Record.” 

     

    Read the article.

     

  • HWW Collaborative Project Studies Climate Change in Antiquity

    From the Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches between Empiricism and Theory Research Challenge Project. 

     

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium, which is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities, awarded approximately $136,000 over the course of three years (2018-2020) through the Franke Institute for the Humanities (the consortium's partner institution at the University of Chicago) to the project “Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches between Empiricism and Theory” —a collaborative endeavour from researchers at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan and Purdue University. The project will investigate in a comparative perspective the social and cultural perceptions of, and experiences with, climate change in the Bronze and Early Iron Ages (third to first millennium BCE), through a multidisciplinary approach that convenes archaeologists, bioarchaeologists and text specialists focusing on three key geographic areas: Egypt and Nubia; the Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia; and Mesopotamia.

     

    Read the article.

  • Announcing the 2018 Humanities Without Walls Research Challenge Grant Recipients

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium is pleased to announce the 2018 Research Challenge Grant recipients. Research Challenge grants fund cross-institutional teams of faculty and graduate students wishing to collaboratively pursue research topics related the subject of the research challenge. This year’s research challenge subject is “the work of the humanities in a changing climate.”

    See the 2018 Research Challenge Grant Recipients.

  • Research Showcase: Hmong Memory at the Crossroads

    How does looking at history from the perspective of those who were written out of it change the way we understand the past? That’s one of the questions Safoi Babana-Hampton set out to answer about French colonial history and the American Vietnam War in Southeast Asia when she received a collaborative research grant from the Humanities Without Walls consortium, funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to create Hmong Memory at the Crossroads. Produced, co-written, and co-directed by Safoi Babana-Hampton, Hmong Memory at the Crossroads is a documentary film that examines the experiences of Hmong refugees in the U.S. Midwest and France. The Hmong people are an ethnic minority from Southeast Asia and China, thousands of whom were recruited by the French and U.S. governments to fight as their allies in the Indochina and Vietnam Wars; hundreds of thousands of the Hmong fled their homelands after the war to seek asylum as refugees. The film follows Liachoua Lee, a Hmong-American from Rochester Hills, Michigan, as he revisits his past as a former refugee and son of Hmong veterans of the French Indochina War (1946–1954), and of the American Secret War in Laos (1961–1975).

    Read more.

  • Awards for "Hmong Memory at the Crossroads"

    After its nomination for Best Feature Film at the Indie Fest USA International Film Festival in October 2015, and its well-received March 2016 premiere at the Musée de l’histoire de l’immigration, at the Palais de la Porte Dorée, Paris, France, Hmong Memory at the Crossroads, led by Professor Safoi Babana-Hampton as Senior Project PI, was featured in the Official Selections of the Universe Multicultural Film Festival (UMFF), Los Angeles, CA, in March 2017, where it won the Best Documentary Feature Award (photos attached from the event), and at the Mediterranean Film Festival Cannes (MFFC), France, in November 2016, where it won the Best Score Award for the original beautiful score composed by MSU Music Faculty Dr. Marjan Helms.  The film was also selected to be screened at the Université des Antilles, in Fort-de-France, Martinique, as part of the annual convention of the Conseil International D’études Francophones, in June 2017.

    The sequel  documentary, Growing up Hmong at the Crossroads. will premiere  at Indiana University, where it will be featured as part of the program of the annual meeting of 20th/21st Centuries French and Francophone Studies Colloquium.  The film is scheduled to premiere in France (Paris) on May 31, in collaboration with  French partners at the Collège d'études mondiales (Institute for Global Studies), whose home is the national research foundation "Fondation Maison des Sciences de l'Homme".  

  • Announcing the Humanities Without Walls 2017 fellows

    Humanities Without Walls is pleased to announce the 2017 Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows. This year’s call for fellows was national one, opposed to previous calls which were limited to students enrolled at consortium institutions. 

     

    This summer, student from thirty universities from across the US will join HWW in Chicago to learn how they might use their humanities training outside of the academy. To learn more about these workshops, please check out the our information page about the alternative academic career summer workshops for pre-doctoral students in the humanities.

  • Birchbark Canoes and Wild Rice by Marcus Cederstorm

    Please enjoy this video about Ojibwe birchbark canoes, created by Marcus Cederstrom, one of our 2015 Alt Ac Pre-doctoral fellows. 

    Birchbark Canoes and Wild Rice from Marcus Cederstrom on Vimeo.

  • 2017 Alternative Academic Career Summer Workshop Call for Applications now open

    The Humanities Without Walls (HWW) Consortium is pleased to announce the 2017 Alternative Academic Career Summer Workshops for Pre-Doctoral Students in the Humanities call for applications is now available.

    These workshops encourage humanities doctoral students to think of themselves as agents of the public humanities and showcase opportunities beyond the walls of the academy in an uncertain academic job climate. In summer 2017, HWW will sponsor our first national summer workshop for graduate students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. 

    We invite applications for fellowships from pre-doctoral students to participate in a three-week intensive, residential summer workshop for individuals who are working towards but have not yet received a PhD in a humanities discipline, and who plan to continue their degree programs while also considering careers outside the academy and/or the tenure-track university system.

    Applications due: September 30th, 2016, Central Time

    Learn more about how the 2017 "Alt Ac" Pre-Doctoral Workshops.

  • Humanities Without Walls grant renewed for $4.2 million

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a $4.2 million grant to the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to support the work of the Humanities Without Walls consortium. The goal of the consortium is to leverage the strengths of multiple distinctive campuses and create new avenues for collaborative research, teaching, and the production of scholarship in the humanities, forging and sustaining areas of inquiry that cannot be created or maintained without cross-institutional cooperation. The grant, which builds on a two-year grant awarded in December 2013, will fund four years of scholarly collaboration through a consortium of fifteen humanities institutes in the Midwest and beyond. 

    The new Mellon grant, led by IPRH Director and Principal Investigator Antoinette Burton, will support the consortium’s two signature initiatives: summer workshops for pre-doctoral students in the humanities and cross-institutional, collaborative awards for “grand research challenges.” The renewal comes with exciting changes to these initiatives. The theme of the next Grand Research Challenge initiative will be “The Work of the Humanities in a Changing Climate.” Interpreted narrowly, this theme calls for collaborative work on climate change, arguably the most pressing grand challenge of our time. Read more broadly, the potent metaphor of climate change offers humanists the opportunity to think about the meaning of all manner of “changing climates” — economic, religious, racial, digital, local or global, to name just a few.

    The pre-doctoral workshops will continue to be organized by the Chicago Humanities Festival. They will alternate annually between offering places to pre-doctoral candidates from the consortium universities and accepting fellows from PhD programs outside of the consortium. 

    Full calls for applications and proposals for both these initiatives will be available by the end of April, 2016.

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium includes Indiana University, Michigan State University, Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Penn State University, Purdue University; and the Universities of Chicago, Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Chicago, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Notre Dame and Wisconsin-Madison. The Chicago Humanities Festival and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are also serving as key intellectual and infrastructural partners for the project.

  • Announcing the Humanities Without Walls 2016 fellows and Global Midwest grants

    Humanities Without Walls is a grand experiment in collaboration at scale. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, HWW has 15 partner institutions centered in the midwest. Participants are engaged in the process of testing big hypotheses through multi-sited research projects that aim to bring humanist expertise to bear on issues of great consequence in the contemporary moment. HWW is pleased to announce both our 2016 Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows and the recipients of the second round of Global Midwest grants. You can learn more about these initiatives and the Humanities Without Walls Consortium at the Humanities Without Walls website.

  • Videos from the 2015 Alt Ac Pre-Doctoral Workshop

    Please enjoy these videos from the 2015 Alt Ac Pre-Doctoral Summer Workshop, created by Anne von Petersdorff-Campen from Michigan State University. 

  • Hmong Memory at the Crossroads: Trailer (English Subtitles)

    Please enjoy the trailer for Hmong Memory at the Crossroads, one of the round one Global Midwest projects. 

  • "Wiigwaasi-Jiimaan: These Canoes Carry Culture" by Marcus Cederstrom, HWW fellow

    Please enjoy this video about Ojibwe birchbark canoes, created by Marcus Cederstrom, one of our Alt Ac Pre-doctoral fellows. 

    Wiigwaasi-Jiimaan: These Canoes Carry Culture from Marcus Cederstrom on Vimeo.

  • An Alt-Ac Summer Workshop That Works (A guest post on The Professor Is In) - Rebecah Pusifer

    Graduate study, as TPII readers know well, is wildly out of step with the current state of the academic job market. Tenure-track positions are scarce and endangered, yet graduate programs have been slow to acknowledge this reality. They continue to peddle the fairy tale of the TT job, often while failing to provide practical advice about the market.

    In July, I attended a funded, three-week workshop that offered a different model of graduate education. Jointly administered by the Chicago Humanities Festival and Humanities Without Walls, a consortium of fifteen humanities centers funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Alternative Academic Summer Workshop invited thirty pre-doctoral students in the humanities to explore how academic training can be leveraged for jobs outside the academy.

    Read the rest of Rebecah Pulsifer's post at The Professor Is In

  • The Alternative Academic Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows Blog

    During the 2015 alternative academic career pre-doctoral summer workshops we asked fellows to blog about their experiences. Please take the time to read their thoughts and reflections at the Alt Ac Workshop Fellows blog

  • Chicago's Alternative Academic Career Summer Workshop - Jonathan Elmer

    “Your dissertation has become a trade press blockbuster. It’s on a display table in the bookstore. What else is on that table?”

    It is day 1 of a three-week workshop in Chicago, and Andrew Benedict-Nelson, from Greenhouse Consulting, is leading twenty-nine advanced PhD students in the humanities through some exercises designed to move the mental furniture around. Starting from their own work—he had boned up on the students’ dissertation projects—Benedict-Nelson (a former PhD student in the history of medicine) is getting everyone to take unlikely moves from their starting point. What would it mean for my book to be popular? (A big jump forward.) Then, what would popular mean—what’s on the table?—if my book is popular? (Now a jump sideways.) The exercise is like a knight’s move in chess. Suddenly, the horizon has changed.

    Read the rest of Johnathan Elmer's post at the MLA Commons

  • $200,000 for Collaborative Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences from the ACLS

    The American Council of Learned Societies is inviting applications for the eighth annual competition for the ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships for collaborative research in the humanities and related social sciences.

    Funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the aim of the program is to offer small teams of two or more scholars the opportunity to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. The fellowship supports projects that produce a tangible research product (such as a joint print or WQeb publication) for which two or more collaborators will take credit.

    The fellowships are for a total period of up to twenty-four months, to be initiated between July 1, 2016 and September 1, 2018, and provide up to $60,000 in salary replacement for each collaborator as well as up to $20,000 in collaboration funds (which may be used for such purposes as travel, materials, or research assistance). The total grant amount per project will depend on the number of collaborators and the duration of the research leaves but will not exceed $200,000 for any one project.

    To be eligible, a project must involve at least two scholars who are each seeking salary-replacement stipends for six to twelve continuous months of supported research leave to pursue full-time collaborative research. The project coordinator must have an appointment at a U.S.-based institution of higher education; other project members may be at institutions outside the U.S or be independent scholars. In addition, all project collaborators must hold a Ph.D. degree or its equivalent in publications and professional experience at the time of application.

    For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit the ACLS website: Complete RFP.

    Deadline: September 23, 2015 (9:00 p.m. EST)

  • Chicago Humanities Festival to Co-host Humanities Without Walls Alternative Academic Career Workshop for PhD Students in the Humanities

    CHICAGO, ILJuly 8, 2015—The Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF) and the Humanities Without Walls (HWW) consortium will launch an ambitious three-week workshop for PhD students in the humanities, focused on professional opportunities in the public humanities. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the workshop will run from July 20 to Aug. 7 at the Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church (126 E Chestnut St). It will introduce 30 PhD students from 15 national universities to Chicago-based public humanities projects and industries, in fields such as journalism, tech, design, and museum curation.

    “There is a perception that a PhD in the humanities is only of value if it leads directly to an academic position. That simply isn’t true,” said CHF Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy. “Training in the humanities puts you in a great position to be involved in issues of importance to your community and the broader public. Humanities Without Walls is designed to help students reimagine their post-doctoral life and consider the skills and networks to access a career in the public humanities.”

    The workshop will feature Chicago leaders across the private, non-profit, and government sectors, including Michael Darling (James W. Alsdorf Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art), Brian Fitzpatrick (Former Google exec and founder/CTO of Tock), Laurel Seely Voloder (Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs, US State Department), and Angel Ysaguirre (Executive Director, Illinois Humanities Council). 

    The Chicago Humanities Festival is also partnering with organizations including the business incubator 1871, Art Institute of Chicago, The Field Museum, Leo Burnett, and IDEO. For a full schedule with a complete list of presenters, visit humanitieswithoutwalls.illinois.edu.

    The workshop will run full time Monday through Friday, beginning on July 20. In addition to presentations, networking events, and workshops facilitated by the Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, the students will also take fieldtrips to partner organizations in the city.

    The 2016 Humanities Without Walls consortium pre-doctoral summer workshop is currently open for application. The applicant must be a humanities graduate student working towards, but have not yet received, a PhD degree from one of the 15 consortium institutions. For more information, visit humanitieswithoutwalls.illinois.edu.

    About the Chicago Humanities Festival
    For 25 years, the Chicago Humanities Festival has celebrated the questions that shape and define us as individuals, communities, and cultures. For the curious at heart, CHF’s vibrant year-round programming and robust Fall Festival offer the opportunity to engage with some of the world’s most brilliant minds. Collaborating with leading arts, cultural, and educational organizations, it presents scholars, artists and architects, thinkers, theologians, and policy makers that change how we see the world, where we’re from, and where we’re going. Under the leadership of Executive Director Phillip Bahar, Marilynn Thoma Artistic Director Jonathan Elmer, and Associate Artistic Director Alison Cuddy, CHF is one of Chicago’s most vital presenting organizations.

    The Chicago Humanities Festival has grown from eight programs in one day at a single venue in 1990, to 160 programs year-round at more than 25 venues in and around Chicago. Over the past 25 years, CHF has put on more than 2,600 programs and performances, and presented more than 3,300 speakers and artists, including: 10 Nobel Prize winners, 70 Pulitzer Prize winners, 52 MacArthur Award recipients, 16 Tony Award winners, 10 Grammy Award winners, and seven Academy Award winners. Visit chicagohumanities.org for more information.

  • The Midwest: America’s Most Common Ground — Common Ground Summit on the Midwest

    “The Midwest: America’s Most Common Ground”

    A Conference on Rediscovering Midwestern History
    Hauenstein Center, Grand Valley State University

    Grand Rapids, Michigan
    April 30-May 1, 2015 

     

    What can the culture and history of the Midwest tell us about the development of democracy, the expansion of industry, and the flourishing of pluralism in America?

     

    In comparison to such regions as the South, the far West, and New England, the Midwest and its culture—the history of its peoples and places; its literature, music, and art; the complexity and richness of its landscapes—has sadly been neglected. And this neglect is both scholarly and popular: historians as well as literary and art critics tend not to examine the Midwest seriously in their academic work, while the myth of the Midwest has not, in the popular imagination, ascended to the level of the proud, literary South; the cultured, democratic Northeast; or the hip, innovative West Coast.

     

    Nevertheless, the Midwest has a history and culture well worth exploring, analyzing, and bragging about. The purpose of our conference, titled “The Midwest: America’s Most Common Ground,” is to excite interest in the Midwest as a region with its own rich, nuanced, and varied history and culture. Our conference will feature keynote addresses and panel discussions on the history, literature, and art of the Midwest, Midwestern leadership and statesmanship, and the budding field of Midwestern Studies. We are inviting numerous scholars—historians, literary critics, geographers—to present on their work on Midwestern life and culture. With this summit we hope to start a conversation on the Midwest that engages the scholarly and popular imagination; most importantly, we hope to start a conversation that lasts. 

     

    Learn more and view full schedule of events at http://hauensteincenter.org/common-ground-summit-on-the-midwest/.

  • Global Midwest Project — The Religious Soundmap Project of the Global Midwest

    Among the recent projects awarded Global Midwest grants is the Religious Soundmap Project of the Global Midwest, run by researchers from Ohio State University and Michigan State University. MSU Today and Michigan Radio have both published articles about this project, which explores religious diversity in the Midwest. You can find links to the articles below.

    Studying the ‘Soundscapes’ of Religion from MSU Today

    Researchers build ‘sound map’ of religion in Midwest from Michigan Radio

  • 2015 Humanities Without Walls Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows

    Humanities Without Walls is pleased to announce our 2015 Pre-Doctoral Workshop Fellows:

    Indiana University Bloomington
    Kristin Francoeur, Religious Studies

    Christopher Moore, History 

    Michigan State University
    Anne von Petersdorff-Campen, German Studies

    Rebecca Hayes, Rhetoric and Writing

    Northwestern University
    Kantara Souffrant, Performance Studies

    Ira Murfin, Theatre and Drama

    Ohio State University
    Leticia Wiggins, History

    Liseli Fitzpatrick, African American and African Studies

    Pennsylvania State University
    Aminah Hasan, Philosophy

    Desiree Valentine, Philosophy and Women’s Studies

    Purdue University
    Matthew Schownir, History

    Amy Elliot, English

    University of Chicago
    Bill Hutchison, English Language and Literature

    Antje Postema, Slavic Languages and Literatures

    University of Illinois at Chicago
    Kei Hotoda, Philosophy

    Tyler Miller, History

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Rebecah Pulsifer, English

    Melissa Seifert, Art History

    University of Iowa
    Noaquia Callahan, History

    Erica Damman, Environmental Humanities

    University of Michigan
    Meghan Forbes, Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Hannah McMurray, Germanic Languages and Literatures

    University of Minnesota
    Robert Smith, American Studies

    Sarah Atwood, American Studies

    University of Nebraska at Lincoln
    Janel Cayer, English

    Brian Sarnacki, History

    University of Notre Dame
    Maria Giulia Genghini, Literature

    Monica Bykowski, History

    University of Wisconsin at Madison
    Jaime Vargas Luna, Spanish and Portuguese

    Marcus Cederström, Scandinavian Studies and Folklore

  • Global Midwest Grants

    Humanities Without Walls is pleased to announce the first round of Global Midwest grants. Below are the titles of the Global Midwest projects. You can see a full list including the PIs and participants from each project at our Global Midwest projects page

    - Hmong Memory at the Crossroads

    - A History of World Music Recording 

    - Aggregating Great Lakes Environmental History: Exploring the Value of Distributed Digital Archives for Research and Teaching

    - Humanities Collaborations and Research Practices: Exploring Scholarship in the Global Midwest

    - The Great Lakes and the Global Midwest

    - The Midwaste: Midwestern Wasteways and Global Futures

    - Perform Midwest: Incubating Collaborative Research

    - African Immigrants and the Production of the Global Midwest: Detroit & the Twin Cities

    - Muslims in the Midwest: An Oral History Project

    - The Midwest Heritage Language Network

    - There There: A Journal of Global Contemporary Art in the Midwest

    - The Importance of the Last Generation: Midwest Heritage German Speakers

    - Open Fields: The Chicago Field Museum's Anthropology Collection and Its Influence on European Enchantments with Native America

    - The Religious Soundmap Project of the Global Midwest

  • New Midwestern History Association Created

    New Midwestern History Association Created

    –Goal Is to Advance Study of Neglected Region–

      

    Sioux Falls, SD -- At a recent convention of the Northern Great Plains History Conference, historians came together at a special meeting to create a new organization focused on advancing the study of the greatly neglected American Midwest.  The Midwestern History Association was launched with the unique mission of giving the American Midwest a stronger voice in the American historical profession. 

     

    “The nation's most subtly fascinating, quietly diverse region now possesses a vigorous association to dissect the Midwest's penetrating two-century reach into the heart of American culture, politics, economy, and identity,” said Yale University historian Jon Butler, who grew up in a small town in Minnesota. 

     

    The Midwestern History Association chose Jon K. Lauck as its first president.  Lauck, a native of South Dakota, is the author of a new book entitled The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press).  “It is a great honor to be chosen as President of this path-breaking new organization and it is wonderful that the Midwest is finally receiving a greater level of attention from historians,” Lauck said.  “I think the MHA will be the inspiration for many future books, articles, conferences, and dissertations focusing on the Midwest.”

     

    “The founding of the Midwestern History Association fulfills a long-time goal of scholars and students of the American Midwest and provides a place where the region's diverse and lively history can be recounted, debated and enjoyed,” commented Emporia State University historian Gregory L. Schneider, a native of Illinois. “Its formation signifies that, like historical associations of the South and and the West, place matters and it demonstrates how much the Midwest as a region has mattered in myriad ways to the formation of American identity, politics, and culture.”

     

    The Midwestern History Association is an outgrowth of the Midwestern History Working Group, which was created at a meeting of historians in October 2013 in Hudson, Wisconsin and which led to a year-long discussion about the need for more scholarly focus on the Midwest.  The Midwestern History Working Group, by unanimous vote, decided to transform itself into the Midwestern History Association.

     

    The Midwestern History Association will support the newly-launched academic journal focused on the history of the Midwest entitledMiddle West Review, which is published by the University of Nebraska Press.  “At long last, America’s Heartland has a regional history organization and a scholarly journal,” commented Indiana University historian James Madison, who grew up in Indiana.  The potential to revitalize scholarship and connect historians of the Midwest to each other and to the general public is immensely exciting.”

     

    The Midwestern History Association will also offer three annual prizes: the Jon Gjerde Prize for Best Book on Midwestern History; the Dorothy Schwieder Prize for Best Article on Midwestern History; and the Frederick Jackson Turner Lifetime Achievement Award.

     

    The next formal meeting of the Midwestern History Association will take place in April as part of the Organization of American Historians’ annual conference in St. Louis. 

     

    For more information, contact Midwestern History Association President Jon K. Lauck: jlauck1941@hotmail.com

     

    The founding board of directors of the Midwestern History Association is set forth below:

     

    Midwestern History Association Board of Directors:

    • Michael Allen, University of Washington-Tacoma
    • Jon Butler, Yale University
    • Andrew Cayton, Miami University
    • Catherine Cocks, University of Iowa Press
    • John Hudson, Northwestern University
    • Zachary Michael Jack, North Central College
    • Richard Jensen, Montana State University-Billings
    • James Madison, Indiana University
    • Melissa Marsh, Editorial Assistant, Center for Great Plains Studies
    • Paula Nelson, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
    • David Pichaske, Southwest Minnesota State University
    • Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, Iowa State University
    • James Seaton, Michigan State University
    • Greg Schneider, Emporia State University
    • Robert Wuthnow, Princeton University 
  • Humanities Without Walls Statement on Academic Freedom

    The Humanities Without Walls consortium stands committed to the principles of academic freedom, free speech, and shared governance that are central to the maintenance of excellence at all universities. In our collaborations, we uphold these standards, encouraging dialogue across disciplinary divides and among scholars, students, and community members, no matter how challenging or difficult the topics may be. As a consortium that grants funds provided by a private foundation, we act together to promote these goals and to advance the standards outlined by the American Association of University Professors.

  • “Humanities Without Walls” Consortium Commences Activities with “Collaboration and the Global Midwest” Workshop in Chicago

    In January, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded $3,000,000 to the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to fund the first two years of an extensive consortium of fifteen humanities institutes in the Midwest and beyond. By leveraging the strengths of multiple distinctive campuses, the initiative, titled “Humanities Without Walls,” aims to create new avenues for collaborative research, teaching, and the production of scholarship in the humanities, forging and sustaining areas of inquiry that cannot be created or maintained without cross-institutional cooperation.  The Humanities Without Walls consortium will be the first of its kind to experiment at this large scale with cross-institutional collaboration.

    The consortium officially commences its activities with a two-day workshop on Friday, September 19, and Saturday, September 20, at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago.

    Friday’s speakers include Dianne Harris, Director of the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Angel Ysaguirre, Executive Director of the Illinois Humanities Council; Jon Lauck, author most recently of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History; and Edward “Ned” Watts, professor of English at Michigan State University and an author on several books on Midwestern cultural history. Their talks will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by Kristin Hoganson, professor of history and gender and women’s studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    Saturday morning’s speakers will address the topic of collaboration in the humanities, and include Patrick Jagoda, assistant professor of English at the University of Chicago and co-founder of Game Changer Chicago Design Lab; Jennifer Monson, professor of dance at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and founder/artistic director of iLAND (interdisciplinary Laboratory and Art Nature and Dance); and Elliott Maltby, partner in thread collective, a visionary architecture and urban design firm emphasizing resilience and sustainability. These presentations will culminate in a panel discussion and Q&A session on collaboration.

    Saturday afternoon will comprise break-out sessions for collaborators from consortium institutions to formulate Global Midwest research proposals, and the workshop will conclude with a session on Innovative Opportunities for Publishing Outcomes with John Wilkin, Dean of Libraries and University Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Maria Bonn, Senior Lecturer in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

  • The call for pre-doctoral workshops applications are now available

    You can find information about the 2015 pre-doctoral summer workshop as well as the call for applications on the pre-doctoral workshop page, under Initiatives.