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Illinois State Water Survey

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  • ISWS wins honorable mention in FEMA's CTP Recognition Program

    As a Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP), the Coordinated Hazard Assessment and Mapping Program of ISWS assesses local flood hazards, identifies high-risk areas, and engages community partners to inform, educate, and empower others to take action in preventing losses from natural hazards.

  • Illinois Farm Bureau highlights vital stats available from WARM

    Wind speed, precipitation, soil temperatures and pest degree days. Farmers can get those vital statistics and more from the Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program (WARM). More than 150,000 visitors--farmers, governmental agencies, industry and academics--regularly check the website at isws.illinois.edu/warm.

  • Will Illinois have snow for Christmas?

    Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel wonders if it will be a white Christmas here in Illinois.

  • November in Illinois: Cool and dry with a dash of snow

    November in Illinois was slightly cooler and slightly drier than average, says the Illinois State Climatologist.

  • Steve Wilson to serve on program advisory committee for National Environmental Health Association

    The National Environmental Health Association (NEHA), a professional society for environmental health practitioners with thousands of members nationwide, has invited Illinois State Water Survey groundwater hydrologist Steve Wilson to participate in its Program Advisory Committee, which helps set policy and direction for NEHA programs.

  • Soil temperatures were warmer than normal in mid-November

    Soil temperatures at 4 inches under bare soil averaged 43.4 degrees on November 14, 4.5 degrees below the long-term average. Daily maximums reached into the low 50s with Fairfield reporting the day’s highest temperature at 52.7 degrees.

  • Water Survey maps complex web of water use in Illinois

    Scientists at the Illinois State Water Survey have developed an interactive map of where every community in Illinois gets its water. Sources include Lake Michigan, rivers and reservoirs, and groundwater.

  • October was the 10th wettest in Illinois

    The statewide average precipitation in Illinois for October was 4.94 inches, 1.70 inches above normal, and the 10th wettest October since 1895, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey.

  • Soil moisture improved in October in Illinois

    Soil moisture levels have improved throughout the state during the first half of October, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program manager at University of Illinois’ Illinois State Water Survey.

  • September was dry and warm in Illinois

    The statewide average rainfall in September was 0.78 inches, 2.45 inches below normal and the 5th driest September on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel at the Illinois State Water Survey.

  • Climatologist compares rainfall from Hurricane Harvey with Chicago storms

    What would happen if the rain from Hurricane Harvey that fell in Houston, Texas, hit Chicago? The result would be unlike any rainstorm that Chicago has ever seen, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel.

  • Illinois has dry soils in mid-September

    Illinois received 0.20 inches of rain for the month as of September 17, 1.59 inches below the long-term average. Dry weather in August and September has led to low soil moisture across Illinois.

  • PRI researchers gain new insights into how groundwater flows within the Illinois Basin

    A conceptual model of water movement in rock layers many feet underground, published by Prairie Research Institute scientists, shows for the first time that water is flowing steadily south through the thick sequence of rock layers that form the Illinois Basin.

  • Water Survey researchers tracked weather changes during the eclipse

    An Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) team documented the eclipse at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center in Simpson, Illinois, to learn how the atmosphere responded to rapid changes in solar radiation as the moon blocked the sun. At the same time, another team recorded climate conditions every 10 seconds at 19 Illinois locations.

  • August was Cool and Dry in Illinois

    The statewide average temperature in August was 70.6 degrees, 3 degrees below normal. This was the 12th coolest August on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel at the Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • Illinois Has a Cool, Dry August

    August was cool across the state and dry in most places in Illinois, capping off a summer that was cool and wet, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • ISWS groundwater expert to participate in community forum on irrigation

    George Roadcap, a scientist at the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) and an expert on groundwater and the Mahomet Aquifer, will participate in a community conversation on irrigation sponsored by the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting from 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Champaign Public Library.

  • Illinois Soils Cooler, Drier in Mid-August

    Soil temperatures at depths of 4 inches under sod averaged 75.8 degrees in Illinois during the first half of August, 1.2 degrees below the long-term average and 4.0 degrees lower than the same period in 2016

  • Researchers study weather and climate conditions during solar eclipse in Illinois

    Watching the sun disappear at midday during a solar eclipse is not only fascinating for viewers across the U.S., but the rare event also presents a unique opportunity for scientists to investigate weather-related changes in Illinois.

  • July Conditions in Illinois Ranged from Floods to Drought

    Northern Illinois experienced heavy rain and widespread flooding in July. Meanwhile, parts of central and southern Illinois experienced dry weather that caused crop damage, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey at the University of Illinois.

  • Warm Soils across Illinois in July

    Soil temperatures at depths of 4 inches under bare soil averaged 79.9 degrees on July 15, 2.1 degrees above the long-term average.

  • June was Warm with Extreme Rainfall Variations across Illinois

    The average temperature for June in Illinois was 72.8 degrees, 0.9 degrees above normal, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel with the Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • ISWS Scientists Contributed to Reports Associated with the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize

    Two Illinois State Water Survey atmospheric scientists, Stanley Changnon and Kenneth Kunkel, contributed to reports issued to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore.

  • Wet Soil Conditions in Illinois

    Higher than normal rainfall across most of the state has led to wet soil conditions,  according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program Manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois.

  • Warmer, Drier Soils in Illinois the First Half of June

    Soil temperatures at depths of 4 inches under sod averaged 77.7 degrees in Illinois on June 14, 4.7 degrees above the long-term average.

  • Surveyors Collect Data on Home Elevations in North-Central Illinois for Flood Risk Project

    As part of an Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) project to determine the risk of flooding for individual homes and businesses in floodplains, licensed surveyors will visit properties to measure the height of structures from late June to July for two pilot areas in the City of Ottawa and the City of Moline.

  • ISWS offers a flood assessment for critical facilities

    When a flood inundates a community, critical facilities such as hospitals and fire stations can lose electricity and equipment used to serve and protect citizens. A flood vulnerability assessment is now available for managers of critical facilities to identify their facility's susceptibility to flooding.

  • Soil temperatures are rising across Illinois

    Soil temperatures at depths of 4 inches under sod averaged 67.5 degrees in Illinois on May 15, 5 degrees higher than the long-term average. Daily highs were in the 60s and 70s for most of the state.

  • ISWS flood mapping program wins FEMA award for outstanding efforts

    PT stakeholders from across the country selected the ISWS Coordinated Hazard Assessment and Mapping Program (CHAMP) for the honorable mention award from the 1st Annual Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Cooperative Technical Partners Recognition Program.

  • A Wet April and Record-Warm January-April in Illinois

    The statewide average precipitation for April in Illinois was 7.01 inches, 3.23 inches above normal and the second wettest April on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel at the University of Illinois’ Illinois State Water Survey.

  • Warm Soils Reported Throughout Illinois

    Soil temperatures rose steadily over the first half of April, increasing 11.5 degrees during the first 15 days. At depths of 4 inches under sod, temperatures averaged 54.9 degrees for the period, 4.4 degrees higher than the long-term average.

  • Report for the Urban Flooding Awareness Act

    The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) has released a new report examining the prevalence and costs associated with urban flooding in Illinois, along with strategies and recommendations for minimizing damage to property from this flooding. The Illinois General Assembly called upon IDNR to prepare the report in collaboration with several state agencies.

  • A Snowy, Rainy March in Illinois

    Statewide precipitation averaged 3.62 inches, 0.66 inches above normal. The highest monthly total precipitation was in Lockport with 7.22 inches, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel at the University of Illinois’ Illinois State Water Survey.

  • Sediment causes economic and environmental concerns in the Illinois River valley

    Researchers at the Prairie Research Institute's Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) have computed a sediment budget over 35 years to determine the amount of sediment coming into the river valley and the amount going out to the Mississippi River

  • February breaks record for warm temperatures in Illinois

    February was the warmest February on record for Illinois, according to State Climatologist Jim Angel at University of Illinois’ Illinois State Water Survey.

  • Soils were warm throughout the state this winter

    Warmer winter soils may have an impact on agriculture and crop pest control this spring, according to researchers at the University of Illinois' Prairie Research Institute.

  • Well assessment tool now available for well inspectors

    Sanitarians, drillers, and other professionals who evaluate private well safety can use a new, thorough well assessment tool from the University of Illinois’ Prairie Research Institute (PRI) to better learn how to assist homeowners and identify potential problems with family wells.

  • Changing methods for road salt application may ease environmental effects

    Salt crystals on roads and parking lots shimmer in the muted sunlight of an Illinois winter day. Once washed away into rivers and streams, salt contaminates the local environment, according to groundwater geochemist Walt Kelly with the University of Illinois’ Prairie Research Institute (PRI).

  • A mild January in Illinois

    The statewide average temperature in January was 31.4 degrees, 5.0 degrees above normal, and the 14th warmest January on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • Cold, dry December ends a warm year in Illinois

    The statewide average temperature for December was 28.6 degrees, 1.3 degrees below normal, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • Fifth Warmest November and Second Warmest Fall in Illinois

    November 2016 was the 5th warmest November on record for Illinois, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

    This year also had the 2nd warmest fall (September, October, and November) on record for Illinois. 

  • Widespread Shallow Groundwater Contamination Found in Southwestern Illinois Cave Streams and Springs

    Researchers have detected prescription and over-the-counter medications and personal care products in Illinois groundwater, an indication that humans are contaminating water that is vital to aquatic life.

  • Soil Temperatures Still Warmer than Normal

    Soil temperatures declined through the first half of November, but still remain higher than normal, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois.

  • Warm October for Illinois

    The statewide average temperature for October was 59.8 degrees, 5.4 degrees above normal, and the on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • Soil Temperatures Warmer than Normal in Mid-October

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Soil temperatures in Illinois were 1 to 2 degrees above normal in mid-October, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois.

  • Sixth Warmest September in Illinois

    September was the sixth warmest on record with statewide records going back to 1895. The statewide average temperature was 70.7 degrees, 4.5 degrees above normal, according to State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • Soil Temperatures Higher than Normal in Mid-September

    Soil temperatures in Illinois are averaging 3 to 5 degrees above the long-term averages, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois.

  • Record-Wettest August in Illinois

    The statewide average rainfall for August was 6.89 inches, 3.30 inches above normal and the wettest August on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois.

  • ISWS Partners on Project to Help Communities Prepare for Climate Extremes

    Climatologists from the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) are partnering with the American Planning Association in a two-year project to assist five Illinois pilot communities in preparing for more frequent climate extremes using current weather and climate data.

  • Farmers Must Adapt to Climate Changes in Illinois

    Farmers who keep an eye on the sky and an ear tuned to the local weather report will also want to pay attention to long-term climate change trends which may sway production decisions down the road.