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  • Grading Is the Worst, or Why You Should Be a URAP Grad Mentor

    The Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program connects undergraduates who are new to research with experienced graduate students who mentor them through the research process. The application for 2020-21 Graduate Mentors is open through August 9. Learn more and apply at https://grad.illinois.edu/URAP. Below is a reflection by Teresa Greppi, a 2019-20 URAP Graduate Mentor.

  • Gain Valuable Mentoring Experience with URAP

    Are you looking for a mentoring opportunity? Whether you are interested in a career in academia or industry, you should be.

    A recent University of Washington (CIRGE) study of PhDs five years after the attainment of their doctorates found that PhD students generally feel well prepared for careers both inside and outside of academia, but additional training in essential professional competencies is still needed. Managing people and projects ranked high on this list, with 31% of respondents in academia and 47% of respondents in the public and private sectors rating this skill as “very important” but only 3% of the respondents rating their training in these areas as “excellent.” Acting as a mentor while you are in grad school can help narrow this gap.

    The problem is, opportunities for graduate students to serve as mentors can be hard to come by. That’s why Graduate College Educational Equity Programs and the Office of Undergraduate Research joined forces to start the Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program at the University of Illinois (URAP). Now in its second year, URAP offers the opportunity for first- and second-year undergraduate students to assist graduate students who are ABD with their research projects.

    Hear what some of our inaugural mentors and mentees had to say about their mentoring experience with URAP at a recent panel discussion...

  • Teaching (and Learning) Beyond the Classroom

    For many Illinois graduate students, the classroom is just one avenue for teaching and learning. We asked three graduate students to reflect on their experiences working with programs that served middle school, high school, and incoming graduate students. Although their research interests and programs differ, they shared a common outcome. Through mentoring, they’d learned as much as they taught.  They shared their thoughts with Grad Life.