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  • 'Hunker down' stress genes boosted in women who live in violent neighborhoods

    A group photo of Illinois researchers, standing outdoors and socially distanced.

    Living in a violent neighborhood increased stress-related gene activity in low-income Black mothers, a study from the University of Illinois and collaborators found.

    Illinois professors pictured, from left: Sandra Rodriguez-Zas, animal sciences; Andrew Greenlee, urban and regional planning; Gene Robinson, entomology and interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; and Ruby Mendenhall, sociology, African American studies and assistant dean of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes: To reach Ruby Mendenhall, email rubymen@illinois.edu. To reach Gene Robinson, email generobi@illinois.edu. To reach Clare Rittschof, email clare.rittschof@uky.edu

    The paper “Transcriptomic analyses of black women in neighborhoods with high levels of violence” is available online.
    DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2021.105174