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  • Study links protecting Indigenous peoples' lands to greater nonhuman primate biodiversity

    Photos of numerous primate species whose territories overlap with Indigenous peoples' lands around the world.

    Species include, top row, L to R: critically endangered northern muriqui; black-capped capuchin, a species of least concern; Colombian night monkey and munduruku marmoset, both listed as vulnerable. Middle row, L to R: Western gorilla, CE; grivet monkey, LC; spectacled lesser galago, LC; and Western chimpanzee, CE. Bottom row, L to R: white-headed langur, CE; Philippine slow loris, V;  endangered skywalker gibbon; and Sumatran orangutan, CE.

    Photos by, top row, L to R: Priscila Pereira, Joan de la Malla, Juan Felipe León León, and Marlyson Costa. Middle row: Rhett Butler, Sarie Van Belle, Yvonne A. de Jong and Thomas M. Butynski, and K. Hockings. Bottom row: Huang Chengming, Hery Sudarno, Fan Peng-Fei, and Perry van Duijnhoven.

    Images

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  • Editor’s notes

    To reach Paul Garber, email p-garber@illinois.edu.

    The paper “Global importance of Indigenous peoples, their lands, and knowledge systems for saving the world’s primates from extinction” is available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau.

    DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abn2927