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  • Soil temperatures decrease statewide

    Cooler weather has caused soil temperatures to decrease across the state, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey at Illinois.

  • Deaths

    Charles “Chuck” Richard Kibler ... Jennifer Joy Loy ... Yoko Muroga (Nakamura) ... Pauline Rymer ... James Wilburn “Jim” Seets

  • How worried should we be about the 2020 census?

    An accurate census is essential for public and private planning, but the 2020 effort is underfunded and behind schedule, an Illinois expert says.

  • Book tells story of integrated Illinois town founded by former slave

    A new book by Illinois information sciences professors Gerald McWorter and Kate Williams-McWorter tells how a former slave founded an integrated town in western Illinois that became a station on the Underground Railroad.

  • Van der Veen honored with Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering

    Renske van der Veen, a professor of chemistry at Illinois, was awarded a Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering, a five-year, $875,000 grant.

  • Monster hurricanes: Why have recent storms been so huge?

    Hurricane Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, as the first Category 4 storm in recorded history to reach shore in the northeast Gulf Coast. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with Illinois atmospheric sciences professor Deanna Hence about the storm’s size, strength and path, and the impact of global climate change on future hurricanes. 

  • Study finds potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa

    A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and other wild mammals – to the benefit of all.

  • New book studies friction between religion, family law

    A spate of Supreme Court decisions on the tension between religious freedom and the protective function of government has caused a sense of unease among religious people, says Robin Fretwell Wilson, the Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law at Illinois and editor of the book “The Contested Place of Religion in Family Law.”

  • Honey bee researcher Gene Robinson elected to National Academy of Medicine

    Entomology professor Gene Robinson, an international leader in honey bee research, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine “for pioneering contributions to understanding the roles of genes in social behavior.” Robinson directs the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Effects of epilepsy on neural activity in mice fluctuate with reproductive cycle, study finds

    Mice with epilepsy have altered patterns of neuron activity in the portion of the brain that controls the reproductive endocrine system, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study. Furthermore, the differences in neuron activity in female mice fluctuate across the reproductive cycle, the team found.

  • University Primary School to hold open house

    University Primary School, the Reggio Emilia-inspired laboratory school of the College of Education at Illinois, is hosting an annual fall community open house Wednesday, Nov. 7.

  • Anderson to discuss 14th Amendment, citizenship, national identity in CAS Annual Lecture

    Illinois education scholar and dean James Anderson will deliver the Center for Advanced Study Annual Lecture on the 14th Amendment and citizenship, immigration and national identity.

  • Bashir named College of Engineering dean

    Rashid Bashir, the executive associate dean and chief diversity officer of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, will become the next dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign effective Nov. 1.

  • Finding water closer to home

    It is just past noon as Zuze Dulanya, Evance Mwathunga and I climb out of the van. The shiny new handpump for Jimu Village sits where just last week a drill rig bored the hole for this much needed, much anticipated new water source. Beneath a nearby row of sweet gum trees, two long benches surround a lone, red-cushioned side chair.

    “Ha!” Zuze says. “We know who will be getting the hot seat today!”

  • Study: Online positive psychology exercises improve quality of life in hemodialysis patients

    Kidney dialysis patients who engage in technology-based positive psychology exercises during their treatments may significantly improve their depressive symptoms and quality of life, a new study found.

  • What effect will Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony have on the #MeToo movement?

    The lasting impact of Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee will be the image of a lone woman speaking truth to power, says Lesley Wexler, a University of Illinois law professor who studies anti-discrimination law.

  • Altman grand marshal of 2018 Homecoming Parade

    Former NASA astronaut and Illinois alumnus Scott Altman will serve as the grand marshal of this year’s University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Homecoming Parade on Friday, Oct. 12 at 6 p.m.

  • Deaths

    Rita Josephine Deters ... John L. Larson ... Marilyn Sue O’Hara ... Joseph H. Smith ... Gerald Durbin Wood ... David Zola

  • Illinois sociologist wins MacArthur fellowship

    Illinois sociologist Rebecca Sandefur has been named the recipient of a 2018 MacArthur fellowship, or “genius grant.”

  • YingYing Zhang Garden to be dedicated Oct. 11

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Robert J. Jones and Kimberlee K. Kidwell, the dean of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, invite faculty members, staff, students and the public to the dedication of the YingYing Zhang Garden.

  • University of Illinois Black Chorus to perform annual fall concert

    Champaign, Ill. - The University of Illinois Black Chorus will perform its fall concert, “Grace (an amazing homecoming),” Sunday, Oct. 7 at 3 p.m. in the Foellinger Great Hall of Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana. The concert continues a legacy of 50 years of sustained campus, national and international musical performances.

    Led for 38 years by University of Illinois professor of music  Ollie Watts Davis, the concert welcomes alumni back to campus and features music from the African-American sacred music tradition, with arrangements of spirituals, anthems, hymns and traditional and contemporary gospel selections.

    The concert is supported by the School of Music at Illinois and Krannert Center for Performing Arts. Tickets are $10 and available for purchase at the Krannert Center Ticket Office. For ticket information, call 217-333-6280.

  • Brandon Seabrook String Trio to perform at Music Building Auditorium

    The Brandon Seabrook String Trio will hold an improvisation workshop at 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, with a performance following at 7:30 p.m., in the Music Building Auditorium, 1114 W. Nevada St., Urbana. The event is part of the Improvisers Exchange, a two-year initiative investigating the field of music improvisation. Both events are free and open to the public.

  • ‘Native America’ documentary including work by U. of I. researchers at Cahokia to be screened on campus

    University of Illinois anthropologists talk about their work at Cahokia in the new documentary “Native America,” about the cities built by Native Americans.

  • September in Illinois had above-normal temperatures and rainfall

    The Illinois statewide average temperature for September was 70 degrees, 3.8 degrees above normal and the 12th-warmest September on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois. 

  • Hopis have made their mark in the world of running, author says

    An American Indian studies professor tells a story of Hopi runners who ran with and often beat the world’s best.

  • Media advisory: Campus commemorates Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Oct. 8

    A celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day will take place Oct. 8 from 11 a.m. to noon on the South Quad near the ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin, Ave., Urbana. A reception follows.

  • Lecture series will bring prominent Jewish writers to campus

    The Program in Jewish Culture and Society's new lecture series, “21st Century Jewish Writing and the World,” features four award-winning Jewish writers.

  • New, highly stable catalyst may help turn water into fuel

    Breaking the bonds between oxygen and hydrogen in water could be a key to the creation of hydrogen in a sustainable manner, but finding an economically viable technique for this has proved difficult. Researchers report a new hydrogen-generating catalyst that clears many of the obstacles – abundance, stability in acid conditions and efficiency.

  • Study: Damaged liver cells undergo reprogramming to regenerate

    In Greek mythology, Zeus punishes the trickster Prometheus by chaining him to a rock and sending an eagle to eat a portion of his liver every day, in perpetuity. It was the right organ to target – the liver has the ability to regenerate itself, though not overnight nor for eternity.

    New research conducted by biochemists at the University of Illinois has determined how damaged liver cells repair and restore themselves through a signal to return to an early stage of postnatal organ development.

  • YMCA launches $1.2 million campaign for support

    The University YMCA, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, is launching its “Transforming Lives, Connecting Communities” campaign to support capital renovations to its historic building, programming support and strengthening of its endowment. The public is invited to the campaign kickoff Tuesday, Sept. 25, from 5-7:30 p.m. at Riggs Brewery, 1901 S. High Cross Road, Urbana.

  • Author of ‘Lincoln’s Body’ to speak Oct. 4, first in Illinois Bicentennial Lecture Series

    An Oct. 4 bicentennial lecture at Illinois will take the measure of Lincoln’s body, in life and death.

  • How has the #MeToo movement impacted the Kavanaugh nomination?

    Without the #MeToo movement and the high bar of a lifetime seat on the Supreme Court, it’s doubtful that the sexual assault allegations leveled against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would have surfaced, says Lesley Wexler, a University of Illinois law professor who studies anti-discrimination law.

  • Paper: School shootings affect school quality, housing value

    Home prices within a school district affected by a school-based mass shooting episode declined by 7.8 percent over the course of at least three years after the incident, according to a new paper co-written by University of Illinois scholar Juan Sebastian Munoz.

  • Campus celebrates the legacy of Project 500 with events Sept. 27-29

    A series of events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Project 500 initiative will take place on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus Sept. 27-29. 

  • Study: Los Angeles nonprofits improving park access for marginalized residents

    A coalition of nonprofits in Los Angeles led a park-equity movement that shifted California’s funding priorities and brought green spaces closer to the homes of low-income people of color, a new study found.

  • Deaths

    Martha JoAnn Milligan ... Charles William (Bill) Smith

  • Author David Quammen to speak about his book featuring microbiologist Carl Woese

    Author David Quammen will speak at the University of Illinois about his new book, which features the revolutionary work of microbiologist Carl R. Woese.

  • Graduate students awarded Department of Energy fellowship

    Two graduate students at Illinois have been awarded Department of Energy fellowships.

    Anda Trifan, a doctoral candidate in professor of biochemistry Emad Tajkhorshid’s research group, has been awarded a Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship to support her research in theoretical and computational biophysics. Edward Hutter, a doctoral candidate in professor of computer science Edgar Solomonik’s research group, was awarded the fellowship to support his research in computer science.

  • Krannert Center’s new assisted listening system to benefit patrons with hearing loss

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts has a new assisted listening system to help patrons with hearing impairment enjoy performances.

  • Researchers develop microbubble scrubber to destroy dangerous biofilms

    Stiff microbial films often coat medical devices, household items and infrastructure such as the inside of water supply pipes, and can lead to dangerous infections. Researchers have developed a system that harnesses the power of bubbles to propel tiny particles through the surfaces of these tough films and deliver an antiseptic deathblow to the microbes living inside.

  • Sulkin named College of Media dean

    Tracy Sulkin, a professor of political science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a U. of I. faculty member since 2002, is the dean designate of the College of Media effective Sept. 16, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • Bike light giveaway at two campus locations 

    Bring your bike to the 11th annual Light the Night event on Thursday, Sept. 20 and get a free set of front and rear lights. Illinois law requires bicyclists riding at night to use lights.

  • From Chicago art to Chinese ceramics, Krannert Art Museum tells stories through its collections

    Krannert Art Museum exhibitions highlight Chicago art and blue and white ceramics from its collection.

  • Campus honored with award for excellence in diversity

    INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine recognized the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for its diversity efforts by including the campus among the 96 schools receiving the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award.

  • Soils are drying, warming across Illinois

    Soils are drying out after the early September rain, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Knobloch honored with Charles H. Woolbert Research Award

    The National Communication Association announces the selection of Leanne Knobloch, a professor of communication at Illinois, as the 2018 recipient of the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award. 

  • Deaths

    Roy F. Block ... Carolyn Margaret (Rexroat) Dodd ... Mary Anne Hewing ... Timothy Gerard Hewing ... Raymond Ides ... David Kay ... Frederick “Fred” E. Payne ... Margaret R. Selin ... Joseph Tarbet Woolley

  • Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide – a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

  • Ebert Symposium to feature IMAX film, astronaut videographer, storytelling with data

    The first Roger Ebert Symposium will explore the cinematic presentation of science with help from an IMAX film shot from space, a former astronaut and a diverse group of academics and experts.

  • Five Urbana-Champaign campus professors named University Scholars

    Five University of Illinois professors at the Urbana-Champaign campus have been named University Scholars in recognition of their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.